Last updated: July 10, 2012

Raytheon has been involved in broad analysis of the groundwater, surface water and air (soil vapor) through a series of methods and in consultation with ARCADIS for a number of years. With regard to private irrigation, Raytheon has undertaken a comprehensive program of testing publicly-registered, private irrigation wells where there is a potential for impact from historic releases. In addition to testing all publicly-registered wells, the company is conducting a door-to-door campaign to try to identify any wells that may not be registered. On this page, we describe those efforts, how that process is being communicated to our neighbors, and what alternate irrigation means are available.

The testing is being done in irrigation wells and does not affect drinking water which is provided by the City of St. Petersburg from an entirely different source.

Q1. How many irrigation wells has the company tested and what are the results to date?

A1. Over 95% of irrigation wells tested are within Florida drinking water standards, with 20 exceeding those standards.  Raytheon’s independent consultant, ARCADIS, has tested and received the following results:

Last Updated: November 18, 2009
Irrigation wells tested: 365
Number of wells within drinking water standards: 345
Number of wells that exceed drinking water standards: 20

NOTE: FDEP uses a stringent and conservative drinking water standard as its default clean-up criteria. Although a relatively small number of the tested wells have revealed some substances that exceed FDEP drinking water standards, these wells do not supply drinking water and are not a threat to public health if used for irrigation purposes, according to Raytheon’s independent environmental consultants based on their assessment of the currently available data.

 

Q2. What additional irrigation well testing does the company plan to do?

A2. ARCADIS plans to sample all of the irrigation wells it can identify and access within the projected area of potential impact, and an additional number that are located nearby. In addition to testing all publicly-registered wells, the company has conducted a door-to-door campaign to try to identify any wells that may not be registered. If you have an irrigation well you would like us to evaluate for testing, please contact us at RaytheonStPetersburg@Raytheon.com and leave us your address and contact information, or call 727-302-4850 and leave the same information, and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

 

Q3. What criteria did the company use to determine which wells would be tested?

A3. Raytheon and its independent environmental consultants sampled every publicly-registered well that could have been impacted by regulated substances. In addition, ARCADIS used public property-owner records, including water management district and City of St. Petersburg database information, to identify private irrigation wells within the potentially impacted area. They have also instituted a door-to-door campaign to try to identify additional wells that may not have been reported by property owners into publicly available databases.

 

Q4. How are we sharing the results with residents?

A4. The test results are being hand-delivered to the occupants of the properties with wells on the same day that they are given to FDEP. We are committed to continuing to communicate with the community as we have more data.

 

Q5. What chemicals have been detected through the testing and what threat do they represent to humans and animals?

A5. The primary substances that may have been released into the environment include 1,4-dioxane and Trichloroethylene (and its breakdown products). Analysis of the data received to date by a leading risk assessment firm, ENVIRON, a world-class international environmental and health sciences consultancy, continues to indicate there is no threat to public health from groundwater drawn from affected private wells when used for irrigation. It is important to remember that drinking water is provided by the City of St. Petersburg from an entirely different source. Nonetheless, Raytheon and the FDEP have recommended that wells that exceed drinking water standards not be used for irrigation purposes until further notice. Raytheon and the FDEP have advised the owners of wells identified as exceeding these limits not to use the wells, and Raytheon plans to offer them alternate means of irrigation by connecting them to City water or other available sources for irrigation water.

 

Q6. Does Raytheon have any plans to assist residents with wells exceeding the safe drinking water levels? Is the company considering switching these residents to an alternate water source for irrigation?
A6. Raytheon and the FDEP advises the owners of any wells identified as exceeding the drinking water standards not to use the wells, and Raytheon has committed to offer them an alternate means of irrigation by connecting them to City water or other available sources for irrigation water.