Last Updated: 03/18/2013*

“Pie is a yummy treat that you eat on Thanksgiving. It is minty and chocolatey and very yummy and it is very, very good.” – Steven, age 9, a student at Florence Sawyer School in Bolton, Mass.

While it’s true that pie is yummy, its round shape also has significance. Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to the diameter – a mathematical constant approximately equal to 3.14.

On March 14 – 3/14 – Raytheon employees celebrated Pi by delivering apple pies to middle and high-school teachers within 3.14 miles of select Raytheon locations in Arizona, California, Maryland, Massachusetts and Virginia.

"What a wonderful surprise to get on a great Math day!" Wendi Hurst, a math teacher at Aberdeen Middle School in Aberdeen, Md. said in a thank-you email. "The best part was that it was still warm."

Celebrate Pi Day! Raytheon thanks math and science teachers nationwide
Susan Totten, an eighth grade math teacher at the Lincoln Brooks School in Lincoln, Mass. accepts an apple pie in honor of Pi Day courtesy of Raytheon Company.

The celebration was part of Raytheon’s MathMovesU® initiative aimed at encouraging kids to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math fields.

Pi is widely used by engineers and students to solve math problems. The pi symbol is commonly used to calculate the area of a circle: the area of the circle equals pi times the radius of the circle squared.

You can also calculate the circumference of a circle: just multiply pi times the diameter.

Though 3.14 is a commonly used to compute these figures, the exact value of pi is much harder to calculate. So far, computers have calculated more than 10 trillion digits past the decimal point.

Celebrate Pi Day! Raytheon thanks math and science teachers nationwide
Heather Metallides, Director of Science and Health at Waltham High School in Waltham, Massachusetts, accepts apple pies in honor of Pi Day courtesy of Raytheon Company. Recognition of Pi Day is a part of the company's MathMovesU® initiative that encourages kids to pursue careers in the science, technology, engineering and math fields.

So mark your calendar for next year's Pi Day, March 14, 2014! You can grab a measuring spoon, bake a pie and deliver it to a teacher to say `Thank you’ for a job well done.

In the meantime, tell us how you celebrated Pi Day 2013 and collect a unique Pi Day badge at www.facebook.com/mathmovesu.

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