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In an unfriendly world, nations must employ every asset to protect their citizens, their resources and their sovereignty.
Vast, unprotected shores and shipping lanes are in constant danger.
Discovering quickly, and with certainty, whether a suspicious vessel is “friend or foe” is critical to the protection of borders from ship to shore.
Robust maritime security draws information from all domains: Air, Land, Sea and Space.
AIR: High-altitude aircraft like Global Hawk host intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems to detect, track and identify targets.

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LAND: Ground stations allow decision makers to share vital intel across communications systems.

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SEA: Shipboard radars and electronic warfare sensors detect approaching vessels and imminent threats.

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SPACE: Orbiting sensors like VIIRS monitor weather patterns to improve disaster warning.

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Shipboard and airborne sensors that can search wide areas are first to spot threats and communicate details to ground systems.
Airborne and space sensors use high-resolution cameras to detect and track suspicious vessels and inclement weather systems.
Analysts review integrated signals, communications and electronic intelligence data to classify and prioritize threats for rapid, real-time response.
The information gathered determines which resources and countermeasures are deployed.
An advanced maritime solution delivers actionable intelligence to decision-makers, ensuring a timely and measured response.
Secure borders, shorelines and shipping lanes provide a pivotal advantage in an environment of complex and varied threats — whether of natural or manmade origin.
Replay
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